Coated papers are often called art papers and are commonly found in glossy art books and textbooks containing photographs or illustrations. They have exceptional runnability and printability, as well as a consistently high-quality surface, stiffness, bulk and opacity. We offer coated paper with gloss and matt surface. Gloss is a shiny and reflective surface on one or both sides of coated papers, produced from compounds added during the papermaking process. Matte is a finish on certain coated papers that is smooth but gives a dull appearance. A good choice for print jobs in which high quality is required. Available basis weights: GLOSS 80, 90, 100, 115,  130,  150, 170, 200, 250, 300, 350 MATT 80, 90, 100, 115,  130, 150, 170, 200, 250, 300, 350 Range of applications: – periodicals; – magazines; – catalogues; – flyers; Coated papers have excellent ink holdout, which is ideal for color reproduction—detail is not lost and fine text holds up well—making them a popular choice for products ranging from books and magazines to annual reports and advertising supplements. Although coated papers can come in matt or glossy finishes, these shouldn’t be confused with varnishes or lamination. These are separate processes that are added at the end of a job. They can add an extra bit of gloss or durability to a printed piece that regular inks can’t provide. While lamination can work well with either a coated or uncoated stock, varnishes are most effective on coated stocks. Coating can be applied by a number of different methods. At least ten types of coaters have been developed, including dip, brush, knife, roll, air-brush, spray, extruded, print, cast and strip coaters. Coating can be applied by rollers on the papermaking machine (film coating or machine coating), or by rollers or blades off the machine (conversion coating). Conversion coated papers generally have a thicker coating and are of a higher quality. Blade coating produces a matte (dull) surface. Gloss is produced by calendering and super calendering papers after they have been coated. The highest possible gloss is obtained through cast coating, which can be done on or off the papermaking machine.